Threadcity Photo Gallery

Mills

 



Windham Manufacturing Company


The Windham Manufacturing Company's Willimantic mills are seen here in 1907. This Company was organized in 1824, and became one of America's largest producers of "duck cloth" used extensively in sailing ship sails. The mills closed for cotton cloth production in 1928, but were home for several industrie

Windham Manufacturing Company

The Windham Manufacturing Company's mills were located on Bridge Street. The buildings were later occupied by the Quidnick-Windham Company, a silk manufacturing company, and after World War Two by the Electromotive Company.


Windham Manufacturing Company


The Windham Manufacturing Company. In the early 1800s, the mill started out as “Smithville Manufacturing” (and was known locally as “The Hayden Mill”). It was bought by the Quidnick-Windham Manufacturing Company and produced broadcloth for men's suits as well as “duck cloth (canvas)”. In 1909 it added a power plant with its 200 foot high smoke stack. In 1924 it became Windham Manufacturing Co.










Turner Silk Mill

The Turner Silk Mill, stood on the western corner of Bank St.and Valley St. It was built in 1888. The company went into liquidation in 1917, and was later used by the Willimantic Trade School. It was demolished in 1970.



















Smithville Manufacturing Company

The Smithville Manufacturing Company's cotton mills stood on the eastern side of Bridge Street. The company was well known for its high quality duck cloth, a hardwearing cotton cloth that was used in sailing ship sails, and in sailors' uniforms. Cotton cloth had been weaved on this site since the early 1820s. The mills were demolished in 1940
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Smithville Manufacturing Company


This view on the right was taken from atop a Main Street business block and shows the company's dam and its stone worker housing in the bottom right hand corner. The street, which ran to the Rail Depot, was known as Stone Row.



 
Morrison Machine Company and
Natchaug Silk Company

The Morrison Machine Company's factory is the wooden structure, and was located on Valley Street.


 
Morrison Machine Company and
Natchaug Silk Company

Natchaug Silk Mill The Natchaug Silk Mill on North Street was built in 1881/1882 by Frederick Dwight Chaffee. The factory was later taken over by the Windham Silk Company and Brand Rex.



 Morrison Machine Company and
Natchaug Silk Company

Morrison Machine Company & Natchaug Silk CompanyThe Morrison Machine Company's factory is the wooden structure, and was located on Valley Street.
The Natchaug Silk Company's mills, built in 1888, stood on North Street. The Morrisons manufactured silk spinning machinery, and the Natchaug Company was famous for its high quality dress silk. The former company's mills were taken over by the Windham Silk Company in 1910. The latter company went into liquidation in 1895, due to a financial scandal. The Brand Company later used their mills in the 1950s.




Natchaug Silk Company

. Natchaug Silk Company MillThis is the North St. façade of the Natchaug Silk Company (in the 1950s, William Brand was located there). Col. J. Dwight Chaffee had the building erected in 1887 and by the time it was completed his business had grown so much that he also began taking over space in the adjoining Morrison Machine Company’s building on Valley St. One of the great innovations of this company was to allow purchasers to buy directly from the mill and so Natchaug Silk became a very early mail order business.


 
Holland Silk Company - Valley Street

The Holland Silk Company's mills manufactured high quality silk thread in Willimantic from 1864 until 1937, the year the company located to Pennsylvania. The Holland brothers came from neighboring Mansfield, one of the first towns in the United States to manufacture silk thread

 
 

 
Holland Silk Company 


The Holland Mills were on the northeast and northwest corners of Valley and Church Streets.


Roselin Mfg. Co.Milk Street

This circa 1912 photo shows the back side of the Roselin Mfg. Company’s Milk Street plant before the hurricane of 1938 demolished the second floor




The Chaffee Silk Mill, pictured on the corner of Church and Valley in a building erected in 1872. J. Dwight Chaffee manufactured high quality silk thread and silk fishing lines from this site, well into the 20th century. This building was also fell victim to early 1970s city redevelopment.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 
The Hop River Warp Company

It
was begun by Willimantic's William Jillson and closed in 1891.  Its location is sometimes said to be Columbia, other times, Willimantic. The Hop River flows into the Willimantic River in the area (today) where the RT6 expressway crosses the Columbia-

 
Willimantic Cotton Mfg. Co.


The Willimantic Cotton Manufacturing Company was established in 1814, one of the first in Connecticut. "Eagleville Lake was created as a reservoir for the mill's water power. When the Eagle Manufacturing Company took charge in 1822, the village became Eagleville. Rifle parts were made during the Civil War, then the mill returned to cotton production under several changes in ownership. When the textile business failed in 1931 during the Depression, inner-soles for shoes were made at the mill until it was abandoned in 1953 and then burned in 1956.

 
Conantville Silk Mill

Mansfield's Conantville Silk Mill was built just before the Civil War. It was taken over by Max Pollack in the early 20th century to manufacture cotton thread. The old mill building is perhaps known to locals as the Shaboo Club, which burnt down in the late 1970s. The Eastbrook Shopping Mall stands on the site today
 

 







       
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 


American Screw



 
Quidnick Mfg.
Photo courtesy Butch Ives
 
Quidnick Mfg.
Photo courtesy Butch Ives